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Meet the future with eight hands-on experiments in the big picture of human civilisation. This year, with Fiffy the robot as our special guest.

Meet the Future ...and Fiffy the Robot

Meet the Future ...and Fiffy the Robot

Meet the future with eight hands-on experiments in the big picture of human civilisation. This year, with Fiffy the robot as our special guest.

“How do we want to live in the future?” With almost eight billion people and counting, we have become a serious heavyweight. Not the forests, not the oceans, not the atmosphere, it is us people responsible for the future of our planet.

In the so-called Anthropocene, human civilisation is considered to have the dominating geophysical influence on our planet, including the responsibility for its future. Having pushed the planetary envelope, we are now confronted with critical issues such as climate change, resource efficiency, biodiversity and CO2 emissions.

This year, our graduates have put themselves in the big picture of human civilisation in showcasing eight hands-on experiments. Through new dialogues with animals, speculative scenarios, unstable matter and identity-seeking artworks, we offering an invitation to join us in some exciting thought experiments.

Fiffy the robot is this year’s special guest for a bit of human self-reflection. Robotisation and artificial intelligence might support us, or save us, more than we think in our search for alternative solutions, and so we are sharing our first surprising steps in ways of working with our university’s latest employee.

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Burg Giebichenstein University Halle

Founded in 1915, the Burg Giebichenstein University of Art and Design Halle offers excellent educational and study conditions for over 1,000 students. Visionary thinking and design are promoted in more than 20 fields of study, as is the development of practical professional skills. The BURG explores the tension between practice and research and is networked with numerous institutions and research centres. Thinking and working across genres is encouraged by a broad-based basic education.