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An inclusive design solution for blind and partially sighted people to navigate the world beyond vision.

Sensaura: Navigation Beyond Vision

3D viewing room
Sensaura Wearable Technology
Sophie Horrocks

Sensaura is an inclusive design solution for blind and partially sighted people to navigate the world beyond vision. The wearable technology communicates a spatial audio language which enables independent travel and has the potential to transform hands-free navigation in future urban planning.

How can we navigate the world without sight?

In the U.K. today, nearly 2 million people are living with sight loss. This figure is set to double by 2050. Sensaura is an inclusive design solution for blind and partially sighted people to navigate the world beyond vision.

The wearable design proposes an integrated solution to enable detection, processing and feedback of environmental information needed for navigation; allowing independent, hands-free travel of indoor and outdoor spaces.

Sensaura’s combined sensors translate visual information into a multi-sensory augmented reality experience of spatial audio and tactile feedback. Test subjects have said this experience gave them a feeling of having an “extra sense”. The wearable could work independently or connect to a wider network of beacons in the environment when GPS is unavailable.

Sensaura engaged with users and stakeholders worldwide throughout the design process to ensure it provides a desirable and sustainable solution.

Sensaura could transform hands-free navigation for millions of people worldwide beyond this user group with great potential to be applied to contexts such as safety, urban planning and sports.

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Sophie Horrocks

Sophie Horrocks is a human-centred designer and researcher who believes that design has the power to improve human quality of life. Her work is driven by the principle that in order to achieve this, we must recognise the value of empathy-driven, not just evidence-based design.

She applies this principle to the design of research, interfaces and environments; promoting inclusion and accessibility by using multi-sensory designs that go beyond just vision.