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Without the high flight of the mind, we are nowhere

Ascension [ Mind & Matter ]

3D viewing room
Healing
Victor Sonna

I eat nature to live and to live, nature eats me in return. Neither nature nor I really die. There is only an amalgamation, a mutual transformation.

Nature plays an invaluable role in everyday products. Products leave nature as raw material and end up with man, who is part of nature. Man, who is also occupied with the artificial, is challenged to let the natural nowadays be natural.
When I was seven years old, I had to face death as the inevitable end of the cycle of life. My father died around that time. Nature has limits and limits are about acceptance. Everything around us can just as easily break down, change or disappear altogether.
Consciousness is an excellent medium for spiritual contact with the soul.
We cannot break the link in a step that does not depend on us. If individual life is just a physical walk and the body an envelope to be inhabited by a human being, it is the human spirit that acts and gives this soul to this physical carcave. Ascencion is often a metaphor for the here and now in all its manifestations, not shrinking from daring to ask vital questions and confront us with the existence of imperfection and mortality.
Ascension embodies the idea that everything is connected and that we are constantly in transition, and it puts the emphasis on representation instead of establishment.
Ascension is the autopsy of imagination and reality.

Victor Sonna

I am touched by what goes on between things. Sometimes, a tension arises there. An example of this is that between my mother and me, the torn slippers got a chance at acquiring a different identity Another example of this tension is me having to invent myself time and again between Cameroon and The Netherlands. This tension does not have a fixed form, no fixed name or definition. But it is certainly there. It doesn’t have anything to do with the supernatural, with magic or with intuition. On the contrary, it is particularly palpable in the here and now. This tension forms the basis of my work.

As a child I wore torn slippers. I didn’t dare to show my mother the holes in them, as there was no money for new ones. I continued to wear them. Each night I took off my torn slippers and turned them into different things, for instance, into a boat, a car or an island. I made up new contexts for these torn slippers, with them getting a new identity. The boundary between image and reality was blurred.